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WSB-TV newsfilm clip of Marion Page, executive secretary of the Albany Movement, interviewed by an unidentified reporter regarding the Albany Movement's efforts to secure civil rights for African Americans in Albany, Georgia, 1962 January 31

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@ Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

WSB-TV (Television station : Atlanta, Ga.)

Description

In this WSB newsfilm clip from Albany, Georgia on January 31, 1962, an unidentified WALB reporter interviews Marion Page, executive secretary of the Albany Movement, about the goals and efforts of the Albany Movement, including the ongoing bus boycott, the dearth of negotiations, and an appeal to the goodwill of all citizens.Page responds to the reporter's question about the movement's plans for long-term transportation goals by affirming his hope for adequate public transportation, as well as the ongoing cooperation of local African Americans in organizing carpools and patronizing taxi services as long as necessary. Page explains freedom is the real issue, and that while carpools and taxis may be expensive, no price is too great to pay for freedom. Interspersed with Page's comments on the bus boycott are images of parked buses, the bus barn, and African Americans using carpools, as well as Albany Mayor Asa D. Kelley stating the need for discussion "among honest people seeking honest answers."The Albany Movement-led bus boycott began after the January 12, 1962 arrest of Albany State College student Ola Mae Quarterman, called the "Rosa Parks of Albany" by some. On January 29, the Albany Movement and the local bus company Cities Transit successfully negotiated a compromise to end the boycott. However, the city commission not only refused to recognize the agreement between the two parties; they also refused to sign a written statement that they would not interfere with their arrangements. Bus service ended at midnight, January 31; that same day, the city...

Record Contributed By

Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

Record Harvested From

Digital Library of Georgia